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The Arrowverse Should Stick to Smaller Crossovers | CBR

The first Arrowverse crossover took place in 2014 between Arrow and The Flash. Since then, these television events have become an annual tradition that only gets bigger in scale. More and more characters, from DC’s Legends of Tomorrow, Supergirl and Batwoman became involved in the likes of “Crisis on Earth-X” and “Elseworlds,” until The CW delivered its biggest and most ambitious crossover yet in 2019’s “Crisis on Infinite Earths.” The network’s latest crossover involved all of the Arrowverse series and adapted one of the most colossal comic book events in DC’s library.

Naturally, once “Crisis on Infinite Earths” was over, fans wondered what could possibly follow since this crossover was, essentially, as big as it could get. Well, the answer was recently revealed: the next crossover will be scaled back considerably. This event will be much smaller and take place only between Batwoman and the yet-to-premiere spinoff Superman and Lois. It’s surprising that the Arrowverse is going smaller instead of bigger — and it’s undeniably a good thing.

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The original Arrowverse crossover took place between its two main stars: Barry Allen and Oliver Queen. Therefore, it almost makes sense that, as we head into a new era for this version of the DC Universe, the next crossover will take place between two of its burgeoning lead. Batwoman only just concluded its first season, while Superman and Lois will premiere next year. Therefore, the crossover will help establish a strong relationship between Gotham’s Caped Crusader and the Last Son of Krypton, and it will solidify Kate Kane, Clark Kent and Lois Lane as three important pillars in this new phase of the Arrowverse.

By going smaller, this crossover will be able to focus on character first and spectacle second. What’s more, it could easily be used to lay the groundwork for a much bigger event down the line. After all, there were five crossovers before “Crisis on Infinite Earths,” which was essentially the culmination of everything that had happened since the premiere of Arrow in 2012. Therefore, the first crossover between Batwoman and Superman and Lois could be just like the first event between Arrow and The Flash. It could be the start of an all-new story that will culminate many years later in some other type of massive event.

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Since the Arrowverse shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon, there will surely be plenty more annual crossovers following Batwoman and Superman. With a vast tapestry of characters at their disposal, The CW would do well to keep that formula for at least a few years. There is a novelty to having the stars of various superhero shows share the screen, and more often than not, there isn’t enough time to get the most out of this mileage because there are other characters to showcase and big set pieces to get to. Smaller crossovers give time for the characters involved to shine, and it helps solidify the bonds that make up the Arrowverse.

This doesn’t mean that we don’t want another superhero epic like “Crisis on Infinite Earths” again. It’s just that the network needs to once again take its time in building up to something as massive. As fans saw in Avengers: Endgame, it only helps to have such a big payoff feel earned. And whatever happens next in the Arrowverse, whether it’s another Crisis or a Blackest Night-type of event, it needs time to be fully fleshed out.

Created by Caroline Dries and developed by Berlanti Productions and Warner Bros. Television, Batwoman stars Ruby Rose, Rachel Skarsten, Meagan Tandy, Camrus Johnson, Dougray Scott, Elizabeth Anweis and Nicole Kang. The series airs Sundays at 8 p.m. ET/PT on The CW. Superman and Lois is set to premiere in 2021.

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The CW confirmed the next Arrowverse crossover will be much smaller compared to “Crisis on Infinite Earths” — and that is undeniably a good thing.

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